May Day, International Workers Day – Rally in Durham

All Out for May Day, International Workers Day – May 1, 2018

ORGANIZE, ORGANIZE, ORGANIZE IMMIGRANT, UNDOCUMENTED, BLACK, MUSLIM, INCARCERATED & ALL WORKERS!

6:00pm – Opening rally at Police Headquarters, 505 W. Chapel Hill St., Durham
6:30pm – March kicks off
7:00pm – Rally in front of jail/DPAC

RSVP on Facebook

We call on all people of conscience, people who love their families and their communities, people who believe that every worker deserves dignity and respect:

Mass Action & Resistance on May Day, International Workers Day!

Boss Trump’s regime has shown in its first year and a half what they are all about: attacks on working people’s healthcare, raids and deportations, more wars and increased attacks on worker right’s to organize.

WE MARCH FOR:
• A Workers Bill of Rights for all Workers!
• Workers Rights Commission in Durham now!
• $15/hr, a union and collective bargaining rights for all workers, including incarcerated workers!
• Housing is a human right – End the eviction crisis now!
• An end to raids and deportations! Stop all check-points!
• ICE out of everywhere – Sanctuary cities, schools, neighborhoods!
• An end to racist police murders and brutality – Police out of our neighborhoods and schools! End excessive funding for police and prisons! Police accountability and community oversight
• An end to wars abroad! Cut funding for Pentagon and NATO to fund the people’s needs! No to militarization of the US southern border!
• Tax the Wealthy and Corporations, not Workers! Fully funded public jobs program and all public services! NO budget cuts!
• An end to rape culture & violence against women and LGBTQ people
• Defend Clean Water! Environments free from all pollutants such as dumpsites, hog farms and destructive pipelines. Stop corporate control of food systems, through GMO’s and FDA manipulation.
• Free and appropriate healthcare including reproductive and mental healthcare for all.
• Fully funded public schools including full-time teacher assistants, nurses and social workers as well as specialized art, music, world language and P.E. educators
• An end to the school to prison pipeline and a funded implementation of restorative discipline practices
• The right to build political & people’s power in the streets and at the ballot box

We invite others to join this call!

A GLOBAL ACTION
On the eve of the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. we remember what he taught us – the triple evils of POVERTY, RACISM and MILITARISM are forms of violence that exist in a vicious cycle. We must fight them all at once on a global basis. It is no longer possible for the workers and the oppressed to conduct our struggles on a solely local basis. The changes in global capitalism have made it both necessary and far more possible for the struggle to be waged on a globally coordinated scale. John Bolton being elevated to be Trump’s National Security Advisor only creates more likelihood of strike-first wars abroad, including renewed threats against Syria and Russia. And recently, over 1,000 Palestinians were shot in peaceful protests demanding the right to return.

Boss Trump’s tax plan was a massive shift of wealth away from workers and into the hands of corporations and the wealthy. While simultaneously increasing military spending to $700 billion, state and federal budget cuts loom on the horizon, gutting vital social service programs. The tariffs projected for steel and aluminum blame workers abroad and will only result in further job cuts. The looming Supreme Court decision on Janus vs. AFSCME, could turn the rest of the country’s public workers into right-to-work open shops.

At the same time, we salute the rank-n-file education workers who have built statewide strike actions in West Virginia, Oklahoma and Arizona. This type of bold mass action has lots of lessons for all working people. We say: make the banks and energy corporations pay!

The attacks on the DACA program, threats of militarizing the southern border, and ICE raids have intensified the terror facing immigrant families. On April 11, ICE conducted raids across the country, locally they detained 6 undocumented immigrants in Orange County, NC.

Durham is facing an evictions crisis, where over 1,000 families get evicted every month. It’s our bosses that are gentrifiers, that are making super profits off our misery and displacement.

The Trump administration continues to promote the devastating Keystone XL, Dakota Access and Atlantic Coast pipelines, one of which cuts through our own state, while also threatening to totally gut the EPA and its environmental protections. Sexual violence continues to happen at epidemic levels in the U.S., and women and people who are Black, Latinx, indigenous, queer, and transgender are at highest risk.

We invite all working people, students, immigrants, Muslims, mothers, trans and queer workers to unite in action on May Day!

We welcome mass protests against Trump, racism and sexism, and encourage mass action to support workers, immigrants, Muslims, women, queer and trans folks. These mass protests are a sign that millions are becoming woke. We support building an independent resistance led by workers and the oppressed of the planet. We commit to building together with all independent progressive forces to face down global capitalism and wars and rid the world of poverty, hate, and oppression once and for all.

We call on all local organizations of working people to send your endorsements for the 2018 May Day action to durhamworkersrights@gmail.com

Onward to May Day Mass Day of Action!

#MayDay #1u #1uenough #unionpower #OrganizetheSouth

HERALD SUN: Durham City Council wants to overturn N.C. ban on collective bargaining

WNCN: Durham school board votes to end custodian outsourcing

 

DURHAM, N.C. (WNCN) — The Durham school board vote unanimously Thursday night to have all its custodians become Durham Public Schools employees, rather than work with outside contractors.

DPS Chief Operating Officer Aaron Beaulieu outlined a plan to begin phasing in an in-house custodial program on July 1, with a goal for full implementation by Jan. 31, 2019.

Currently, a majority of the custodians who work in Durham Public School are employed by contractor Service Solutions or its subcontractor, Premiere. DPS said of its 120 fulltime custodial staff, only 33 are DPS employees. More than 200 part-time staff work for either Service Solutions or Premiere.

“Victory! We won a victory,” said Deborrah Bailey a custodian who was worked for Service Solutions for nine years.

Bailey was one of more than a dozen custodians who spoke during the board meeting. Most were in support of moving custodial services to an in-house model.

“The public put you in office to do the will of the people. The will of the people right now is not to outsource this. The will of the people is to keep this in-house,” one custodian said to the school board members.

School Board members began looking into making a switch from private to public custodial service several months ago after part-time custodians employed by Service Solutions complained of unfair wages.

Part-time employees with Service Solutions receive $8-9 per hour, but receive neither sick nor holiday time, according to a DPS presentation.

During the meeting, board members weighed several options for the DPS custodial program. They ultimately agreed on the in-house model. Under than plan, part time wages would increase to $11.22 per hour, in accordance with the state salary schedule. Part-time workers will also receive paid sick and holiday time.

Full time staff will receive between $13.37 and $16 an hour, paid sick and holiday time, as well as state employee health and retirement benefits.

While board members were in support of moving to the in-house model, there was concern as to whether the switch was feasible, given the district’s current focus on hiring teachers.

Beaulieu suggested, and the the board agreed, that the system hire in stages, beginning in July, to fill custodial management positions. In the following months, head custodians would be hired and trained, equipment and supplies would be purchased, and more than 200 custodians would be also hired and trained.

All custodians employed by Service Solutions or Premier would have to reapply for their jobs to go through a DPS background check.

According to a DPS survey, half of the DPS principals were not satisfied with the quality of service provided by Service Solutions. The survey found a majority of elementary school principals supported moving to an in-house program, while a majority of secondary school principals did not.

READ ON WNCN SITE

INDY WEEK: Durham Workers Are Coming Together To Demand More Rights and Protections from Their Employers

By 

Read the article as it appeared in the Indy here

Labor groups in Durham are uniting to demand more rights and protections for workers in the Bull City.

The Durham Workers Assembly, as the collective is known, met Thursday night to share stories of abuse in the workplace and draft a Workers’ Bill of Rights to present to the City Council along with a request to establish a Workers’ Commission. The initiative was started by Raise Up for $15, the Durham City Workers Union chapter of U.E. Local 150, graduate assistant and adjunct faculty members at Duke University, the N.C. A.F.L.-C.I.O, and the National Domestic Workers Alliance.

Part therapy, part brainstorming session, attendees who spoke about their own experiences at work were moved enough — whether by anger or camaraderie — to diverge from prepared remarks. They spoke about low wages, inconsistent hours, injuries on the job, and missed time with their families.

“We don’t need a commission, we’re demanding that shit,” said Eric Winston, with
Raise Up for $15, part of the national Fight for $15 movement to raise the minimum wage. “We need to get angry. We’re too nice with these people.” Winston said he works three jobs to support his family, including an elderly mother and sick relative, and rarely has time to spend with his children.

“I’m missing money right now,” he told the group.

Continue reading INDY WEEK: Durham Workers Are Coming Together To Demand More Rights and Protections from Their Employers

HERALD SUN: Is Durham a union town? Labor groups hope so.

On eve of Martin Luther King’s Day, workers from across industries united to demand Workers Commission

Durham, NC—At 4PM on Friday, January 12, more than 40 workers and community allies gathered in front of City Hall to launch a city-wide campaign to unite working families for better working and living conditions in Durham.

At the rally, Daryl Brunson, solid waste equipment operator with the City of Durham and a UE150 steward spoke. “This past summer, a city worker in Charlotte was killed from heat-related illness after working overtime in the summer heat,” he said. “We are fighting for a safety policy to protect against this.”

The Durham Workers Assembly made their public launch after months of meetings. According to organizers, they timed the public launch for the Friday before Dr. King holiday because Dr. King’s Poor People’s campaign had at its heart the fight against economic and racial injustices, which included core union rights, many rights we are still fighting for today in Durham.

Priscilla Smith, leading member of the Durham chapter of National Domestic Workers Alliance – We Dream in Black Chapter, stated “we are here fighting for living wages because the cost of living is continually rising but our paycheck are not rising with it. The world says you are not doing your part if you don’t go to work and pay taxes, but we are doing that and are still not able to support our families…They say raise your children but how can you when you have to work so hard and long to provide a roof over their heads and put food on the table?”

Cathy Shuman, an executive board member of the SEIU Southern Region-affiliated Duke Faculty Union also spoke at the action: “Our coalition unites workers from different neighborhoods, different races, and different industries. We’re fast food workers, home care workers, maintenance workers, transportation workers, and teachers, like me,” she said. “Together, we’re sharing our struggles and sharing our power, taking our efforts to local employers and elected officials.”

The Durham Workers Assembly will be organizing worker speak-out forums as a space for workers across the city to address common workplace issues. The next event will be on February 1st. It will be the first forum where several city council members are expected to make an appearance.  The press is invited to attend to hear stories of local worker organizations.

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The coalition campaigning for a Durham Workers Commission is being organized by the Durham Workers Assembly which includes unions, community groups, and worker activists who are dedicated to making Durham a better place to live and work including the which is composed of Raise Up for $15, Durham City Workers Union chapter of U.E. local 150, graduate assistant and adjunct faculty members of SEIU Southern Region at Duke University, N.C. A.F.L.-C.I.O, National Domestic Workers – We Dream in Black and many non-unionized workers from across Durham.